Illegal Mexicans Reasons To Come North to U.S.

October 2008 to the present 2018

A Good Life In Mexico For Mexican Nationals

“The Mexican Dream Is A Fact And A Way Of Life.”

The Illegally Entering People, that are passing through Mexico to the U.S., are they looking to work in the fields of the US in 2008?

  • The legally entering Mexicans work the seasonal jobs then return to Mexico.

  • The majority of Mexicans choose to live and remain in their country, a proud spirit of being Mexican runs throughout the country.

  • Multitudes remain In Mexico and live a very comfortable life in the border regions, working in any of the two thousand eight hundred companies in the multi-national plants within their border areas.

  • There Are Millions in the northern Mexico areas along the Mexican U.S. border from California to Texas.

  • Trained and crossed trained working within the various jobs applications where semi-skilled to skilled professionals are utilized.

  • Production assembly of quality products in one of the most highly technically advanced work centers globally.

  • The quality and high standards that are required for a continual market share by meeting the international community requirements for quality goods and materials is essential, for long-term growth and economic prosperity.

  • The standards required within these industrial parks located within Mexico are under intense market-driven pressures, competing in a world-wide work-forces with these global incentives, and that being, all wanting a greater Global share of work. 

  • Mexico Has demonstrated and will continue to meet the global challenges in their expanding worldwide exports sales assemblies.

  • Their global work skills proficiency levels have enabled them to be in high demand by the International employers.

  • The Mexican Nationals with schooling, training, coupled with language learning skills with English being a primary targeted language, are realizing through their hard work and further commitments, the “Mexican Dream” of a better life for them and their children, and being a strong voice of change within Mexicos Global Workforce Community.

  • N. Oetker… As One Reads Through The Pages Below it will become evident, that those who venture to northern Mexico, on their illegal way to the U.S. will have contact with millions of middle class successful Mexican citizens, who are succeeding in their quest for a better lifestyle in “MEXICO.”

  • According To NAFTA’s report below there are 2,808 international factories in Mexico, it will become very clear that these are specialized jobs, and that the locals, have invested in themselves, by attending local government initiated technical schools to help them in attaining the work-skills necessary to compete in the global workplace, which requires the production of consistent quality parts.

  • The question for discussion is not that there aren’t jobs in Mexico but what is the real motivation for illegal immigration activity?

  • As with all things of Mexico it will be the Mexicans that will need to step forward and address the truths of this issue also.

SOURCE NAFTA 2005 -2006 PRESENT AND BEYOND

http://www.teamnafta.com/ssp/2008_site_selection_package.pdf

  THE MANUFACTURING EXPORT INDUSTRY

In 1965 the Mexican Government Established the in-bond or maquiladora (INDUSTRIAL PARKS) program, a program that allows duty-free importation of raw materials, components and equipment needed for the assembly or manufacture of finished goods for subsequent export. The program originated from the need to industrialize northern Mexico and slowdown migration to the U.S. by creating jobs along the border.

There are 2,808 Maquiladora companies operating in Mexico with nearly 90% of them in the border zone. The maquiladora industry currently employs 1,181,284 people. In Ciudad (City) Juarez alone, the industry employs 231,000 people.

  • N. Oetker footnote this city Juarez according to local news, currently is controlled mostly through fear and intimidation from drug cartels and corrupt officials. The newly elected administration in Mexico has disarmed the local police in these border regions and have sent in the military…. the axiom holds true and that is, “if you want to find the problems, follow the money.”

  • According To The Auto Industry Association (AMIA), Mexican auto production expanded 6.6% in 2005 to 1.6 million units, while exports rose 8.4% to 1.2 million units. It is important to point out that the automotive sector already accounts for more than 20% of total manufacturing output.

Since 1993, the year before NAFTA went into effect, the total volume of trade between the three NAFTA countries has expanded from $294 billion to $1.149 trillion in 2006.

  • Each Day NAFTA Members Conduct Nearly $2.1 billion in Trilateral Trade.

(Source: Secretaria de Economia, Banco de a, US Department of Commerce) MEXICO FOREIGN TRADE

Mexico’s Exports Have Grown exponentially since NAFTA’s inception and the country has been consolidating as a major exporter to the US. During 2007, Mexico exported $194 billion, nearly equalling the all-time high from 2006 of $198 billion, and a big leap over 1993 levels, the year prior to NAFTA implementation, when it exported $39 billion.

In 2007, Mexico’s Trade surplus with the United States reached $67.7 billion US dollars, the highest surplus ever.

Sales from Mexico to the United States have increased $59.4 billion between 2002 and 2007. Immediate access to the US is a primary advantage for companies producing products that require tight logistical time frames to re-enter the US, heavy products that have high transportation costs and where quality is more important than price.

THE MANUFACTURING EXPORT INDUSTRY

In 1965 the Mexican Government Established the in-bond or maquiladora program, a program that allows duty-free importation of raw materials, components and equipment needed for the assembly or manufacture of finished goods for subsequent export. The program originated from the need to industrialize northern Mexico and slowdown migration to the U.S. by creating jobs along the border.

There are 2,808 maquiladora companies operating in Mexico with nearly 90% of them in the border zone. The  maquiladora industry currently employs 1,181,284 people. In Ciudad Juarez alone, the industry employs 231,000 people.

MAQUILADORA EXPORTS

Exports in the maquiladora industry reached $94 billion in 2005. The main exports of the maquiladora industry include machinery, electric appliances and materials, sound and image recording devices,TV sets, mechanic devices, optical instruments and devices, photography, precision control and medical instruments, vehicles, plastic manufactures, and garments and accessories.

According  to the Auto Industry Association (AMIA), Mexican auto production expanded 6.6% in 2005 to 1.6 million units, while exports rose 8.4% to 1.2 million units. It is important to point out that the automotive sector already accounts for more than 20% of total manufacturing output.


Periferico Plaza MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

  MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.

CONTACT: normanoetker@hotmail.com  October 2009

 
 

Posted in México by Prange Way on April 19th, 2007

 

Sorianna is the name of one of Mexico’s large food stores.

 

Plaza Periferico main entrance in Reynosa, Mexico  

  • Just a Few Miles South of Pharr and McAllen lies the large Mexican city of Reynosa.  At well over 1,500,000 residents, Reynosa eclipses McAllen’s population by about threefold.  Many people are most familiar with Reynosa and the Mexican cities along the Rio Grande for infamous reasons: rampant crime, poverty, and maquiladoras.  However, upon my visit, I noted that although conditions were noticeably better on the American side, the criticisms of these cities are largely an overreaction promulgated by the American media.  While, like many cities in any country, there were sufficiently visible examples of abject poverty, so too were there modern areas of the city with very typical, American-style conveniences including new subdivisions, convenience stores, big box, and even shopping malls.  In general, the disparity between life in Mexico and life in the U.S., while noticeable, is not as significant as you probably think. 

 

 

Reynosa Strip

 

 

 Mex 40 and Mex 2 Interchange, Reynosa, Mexico

  Since Retail Is Our Focus Here, we’ll take a look at what Reynosa has to offer and consider comparisons to what we’re familiar with on the American side.  In doing this, we hope to provide a brief glimpse into the parallel other world of Mexican retailing.  Much like we’ve found with Canada, they have their own, unique chains and ways of doing things and it’s worth a shot to try and understand.  However, several caveats: we’ve only been to Mexican border cities, and are aware that the interior is probably much different in terms of general conditions and offerings.  Also, we don’t speak Spanish (well, maybe un poco) so much of what we observed may very well have been lost in translation.  That said, we’ll try to explain what we found, and add a new country to our mix in the process.  Diversity is cool, after all.  

 

Reynosa border

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

  • Plaza Periférico Is A New, very modern enclosed mall on the far west side of Reynosa along the heavily-traveled main route to Monterrey.  This route is also the major modern retail strip for Reynosa, and is full of fast food, big box, strip malls, and American-style chain restaurants.  Home Depot, Sam’s Club, Office Depot, McDonald’s, Chili’s, Popeye’s, and HEB are all American stores with presence here.  In addition to those are Mexican box chains and restaurants with which we are unfamiliar, including Sanborn’s department store, City Club warehouse store, S-Mart Grocery, Coppel Hidalgo, and impressively modern hypermarket Sorianna.  In addition, there’s even a new American-style brew pub called Sierra Madre Brewing Company. There are no less than three enclosed malls along or within a very close distance of this strip.  
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  • We’re Starting With Plaza Periférico, which is at the west end of the aforementioned strip near the intersection of México Route 40 and México Route 2.   Consulting Wikimapia, which proved as an invaluable resource for this non-Spanish speaker in finding the retail strips in Mexico, Plaza Periférico was labelled yet not present in the satellite photo.  So, we’re assuming it’s less than a few years old.  Anchored by Soriana, Famsa (appliances), Cinépolis (a large multi-screen movie theatre), Woolworth’s (yes, that very same one), and a large food court, Plaza Periferico is your typical suburban mall.  Most of the stores inside are Mexican chains we’re assuming, but many tenets of a typical American mall remain.  For example, there are cars for sale parked inside, and the same kiosks were used to hock the same stuff: cable television, cell phones, and printer ink.   

 

Plaza Periferico in Reynosa, Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

  • However, At The Same Time, there are differences too.  In the parking lot, parking attendants rush over to you when you get into your car to assist you out of your parking spot.  You back out, and they blow a whistle when it’s clear to proceed forward.  Kind of interesting, yet I wonder why it’s necessary.  To create jobs?  The parking lots were no different or hazardous than those in the U.S.  Perhaps they double as security for the lot because of more frequent thefts, and the parking assistance is just part of their job as well.  The decor is pretty standard for a new mall, but the layout is a bit different.  There are two large, circular courts at each end of the mall, and the anchors are sort of placed haphazardly throughout, yet the organization is efficient. 

    

  •  Take A Look At The Pictures of Plaza Periférico and the surrounding area, taken April 2007.  Since, again, we aren’t very familiar with the Spanish language, finding even Internet resources about this mall didn’t produce much.  So, we once again open it up to you, our readers, to fill in some of the details about this mall and the area in general.

 

   

Plaza Periferico in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico Famsa in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico Woolworth in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico Soriana in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico entrada in Reynosa, Mexico

Plaza Periferico outlots in Reynosa, Mexico Plaza Periferico in Reynosa, Mexico

MEO L.A.M. Norman Oetker Missionary “The Light Amidst the Mong/MEO” Hmong Thailand, Reynosa Mexico, English Class, St. Charles Missouri US.